What should i ask seller to fix after inspection?

In general, it's reasonable to request repairs for any problem in the home that causes health or safety problems. Consider the key systems in the house, from plumbing to electricity, as well as the main foundation and structure of the house.

What should i ask seller to fix after inspection?

In general, it's reasonable to request repairs for any problem in the home that causes health or safety problems. Consider the key systems in the house, from plumbing to electricity, as well as the main foundation and structure of the house. A home inspection usually takes 2 to 3 hours, on average. It is highly recommended to keep children and pets out of the house so that there are no distractions during the home inspection process.

Buyers and their real estate agents can also accompany the home inspector and ask questions during the process. You can apply this strategy to many problems as they come to light. However, if the problem is severe, such as lead paint or a cracked base, proceed with caution. The seller is not required to repair their home before selling it, but is required to provide certain disclosures depending on the state.

What is required throughout the united states is a lead paint statement for homes built in 1978 or earlier. Based on the results of the home inspection, the buyer can negotiate a reduction in the price of the home, apply for loans or even a home guarantee to resolve future problems with major appliances. If it's an older house, this could be a good decision. As a general rule, it's fair and reasonable to ask the seller to repair something that is a health or safety problem.

For example, if left untreated for long periods of time, termites in the home can be a safety problem. It is reasonable to ask the Seller to treat any active termites found. As a buyer, home inspection can be very difficult, but by the end of this post you'll have the tools you need to determine exactly what's right when it comes to asking the seller to repair your future home. As a seller, it's important to prepare for the home inspection process and to know how to negotiate after a home inspection if you receive news that isn't so good.

In Raleigh, the seller is not required to make any repairs to the home, so you may find it more difficult to negotiate after the home inspection, although most sellers offer help, either in the form of actual repairs or financial compensation. Home inspectors have been sued before by sellers who believe that the breach of an agreement was the fault of the home inspector and his incorrect report. However, there are certain reasonable requests after a home inspection and things the buyer should never expect the seller to repair when buying a home. After the home inspection, the buyer can make reasonable requests for home repair, but if the buyer and seller do not reach an agreement, the buyer can turn back.

For the seller, the cost of putting the house back on the market and waiting months to receive new offers (if any) may be higher than the cost of making repairs, and for the buyer this means that you and your agent now have to start looking for the perfect home again.